Movies, Books, Music, Etc
« The Goldfinch by Donna TarttThe problem(s) with MOG's catalog »

Noah

  04/05/14 03:12, by , Categories: Movies, Action, Drama

WARNING: This review contains spoilers.

All right, let's get the obvious stuff out of the way. This movie is not Biblically accurate.

  • In the film, Noah's sons don't have wives. This is actually used as a major plot point. Ham is really worried about the fact that he won't have a wife after the flood.
  • God doesn't speak to Noah in words, but through visions.
  • The bad guy stows away on the ark. Which leads to Ham teaming up with him and someone getting killed.
  • After the flood, Noah does not make a sacrifice to the Creator.
  • Noah doesn't curse Ham for his actions while Noah was drunk.

When Noah recounts the story of how the Creator made everything, evolutionary creation is shown. There are many who feel strongly that the creation account in the Bible should be taken literally, so that scene will probably rub them the wrong way.

I've read some reviews that take exception with the movie's portrayal of Noah as a vegetarian. The truth is, the Bible does say that God didn't permit man to eat meat until after the flood. (Genesis 9:3)

Of course, there are liberties taken which we can't possibly know if they are accurate or not. Was Methuselah a man of God who guided Noah and performed miracles? Did Noah and his family use incense to put the animals to sleep while they were on the ark? Anyone making a movie based on this story would have to fill in some of the blanks to make it worth watching. I mean, Noah doesn't even have any dialog in the Biblical account.

The biggest thing people notice that the movie added to the story was the group of giant rock creatures called Watchers that help Noah build the ark and fight off bad guys. A Watcher is actually a type of angel mentioned in the book of Daniel chapter 4. It is a Watcher (sometimes translated Messenger) that appears to Nebuchadnezzar in a vision.

The books of Enoch (referenced by Jude and likely known by first century Jews) spend a lot of time talking about the Watchers. The movie presents an unlikely representation of them, though. The huge rock creatures might have been inspired by the line "place upon [them] rough and jagged rocks" in 1 Enoch 10:5. But the text says there were 200 of them and they produced offspring with human women. There are only about 10 Watchers in the movie and it seems impossible that they could mate with humans. The story of the Watchers isn't represented correctly according to the books of Enoch in many other ways, but those are the two initial glaring inaccuracies I noticed.

Overall, I feel that the writer did his research on the story of Noah, then picked the elements that he found most compelling and tweaked some facts to create his idea of a great cinematic experience. That being said, I think he preserved most of the themes of the Bible story. Man's betrayal of the Creator. The wickedness of all mankind. The judgment visited on the world because of man. Noah's trust in God. How God provides for his children. All of these themes are included in the movie. Not only are they there, but they are powerfully presented.

This movie portrays the horrors of the story that are often ignored. God wiped out all life on the Earth. It's one thing to acknowledge that and another to see people climbing on top of each other, trying to stay above the water as the land disappears beneath them. This wasn't just a story of cute animals and a kind, smiling man on a boat. Every kind of snake was on the ark and the flood was a distressing event for Noah and his family.

The film also examines the human struggle with God's will and character. Noah struggles with what he feels is a lack of guidance from God. It is not outside the limits of the human mind for Noah to come to the conclusion that God wants all humans dead. He sees the wickedness in the world outside, but he also recognizes the evil living within each of his family members. He knows that God desires righteousness. Mankind has failed and now deserves to be wiped out. Why should his family be spared that judgment? Noah looks for a sign from God that his family should be spared, but there isn't one. God leaves him to discover on his own that there is goodness within humanity worth saving. Just because the Creator isn't communicating directly with Noah, that doesn't mean he's not going to learn how to carry out His will.

There were more changes to the story than I feel were necessary. Nevertheless, it was a thought-provoking film in the best possible way. The questions it raises, the themes it portrays, and the God it alludes to are not misleading.

Ignoring the Biblical aspect of it for a moment, this was a really great film. The acting, visual effects, and drama were all exceptional. It tugged at my emotions and made me care about the characters. It made me think about the motivations for their actions and relate to them. The concepts of love, confusion, dedication, and betrayal were explored with believability.

But there's no getting around the fact that it is supposed to be based on a Bible story. If you can ignore the factual inaccuracies and appreciate the conceptual veracity, I think you will enjoy this film. On the other hand, if it bothers you that the writer twisted some of the details, you won't be able to get past them. You would spend the whole movie thinking about how wrong they got so many things.

I can't fault anyone for skipping Noah, but if you are curious I encourage you to give it a go. It's quite a ride.

This entry was posted by and is filed under Movies, Action, Drama.

No feedback yet


Form is loading...

December 2020
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31    
 << <   > >>

Search

  XML Feeds

open source blog
 

©2020 by Dustin Sullivan

Contact | Help | Blog theme by Asevo | multiple blogs | web hosts